I warned Zuma to move away from the ANC – Motsoeneng

I warned Zuma to move away from the ANC – Motsoeneng

Hlaudi Motsoeneng.

The former SABC COO claims he warned the former president to move away from the party as they would at some point send him to jail.

On the sidelines of the commission of inquiry into state capture, former SABC COO Hlaudi Motsoeneng – now leader of political party the African Content Movement (ACM) – told the media that he had previously warned Zuma to move away from the ANC to avoid ending up in jail.

Motsoeneng, who is at the commission to show his support for the former president, argued that the commission had produced no solid evidence against Zuma.

“He’s not a criminal, he’s not a thief,” he said.

He claimed Zuma was unhappy with the ANC when he had previously met with him, and that he had advised him to jump ship.

“I warned Zuma to move away, I said they are going to take you to jail, these people.

“He [Zuma] still loves them [ANC] and it’s fine, I don’t have a problem and I’m here to support him.”

Motsoeneng lauded Deputy Chief Justice Raymond Zondo’s manner of handling the commission and said although there are different perceptions on how the commission is doing, things appeared under control.

Motsoeneng is the latest political figure to attend the commission’s proceedings in support of the former president. Others have included former finance minister Malusi Gigaba and ANC secretary general Ace Magashule.

Zuma appeared on Friday, where his lawyers announced that Zuma “will take no further part” in the commission.

Sikhakhane said Zuma’s  had concerns surrounding how the commission had “approached” the former president and the manner in which he was “treated” during proceedings from Monday, July 15.

On Wednesday, both the commission’s legal team and Zuma’s agreed to a ruling by Zondo that there would be no testimony on Thursday due to friction between the two teams.

The commission continues.

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