The search for Secretary of Parliament continues

(Photo by RODGER BOSCH / POOL / AFP)

The position of Secretary of Parliament will be re-advertised to attract a larger pool of applicants.

This position has been vacant since the former Secretary of Parliament Gengezi Mgidlana was placed on “special leave” in June 2017 after the National Education, Health and Allied Workers’ Union (Nehawu) levelled allegations of corruption against him.

Nehawu had accused Mgidlana of receiving an ex gratia payment of R71 000, irregularly awarding himself a study bursary over junior staff, and following improper procurement processes.

In September last year, Mgidlana was fired after both houses of Parliament unanimously adopted a motion to this effect. This after Parliament’s presiding officers – Speaker of the National Assembly Thandi Modise and chairperson of the National Council of Provinces Amos Masondo – accepted a disciplinary committee recommendation that Mgidlana should be summarily dismissed after he was found guilty of serious misconduct relating to four of the 13 charges against him.

Penelope Tyawa had been acting in the position since Mgidlana’s suspension.

On Friday, Tyawa informed the Joint Standing Committee on the Financial Management of Parliament that the position of Secretary of Parliament would be re-advertised to attract a larger pool of applicants.

She said they had gone through an appointment process before, which gave them two “appointable candidates”. The one candidate accepted another job offer, and it would not be suitable for the presiding officers to only interview one candidate.

Parliament would appoint a recruitment agency through its supply chain processes to manage the recruitment process with Parliament’s human resources department.

Tyawa envisaged the appointment to be concluded by December or January.

Parliament would follow similar steps to appoint a chief financial officer and a head of security.

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