Danielle Garrett
2 minute read
22 Jan 2021
4:01 pm

Steve Biko Hospital denies botched surgery claims

Danielle Garrett

Righard Roets has claimed that a piece of his brain was inexplicably removed during an alleged botched surgery to repair a brain haemorrhage.

Rieghard Roets shows his scars after the surgery. Photo: Facebook

“We understand that the patient is continuing to make these serious and defamatory allegations against the hospital that saved his life,” said Dr Mathabo Mathebula, Steve Biko CEO.

“We noticed that the patient had a different name when he was admitted here, this delayed our response to media.”

“What is worrying is that he is collecting money, that we believe he does not need, and he is using Steve Biko academic hospital for that.”

Mathebula said the hospital would handle the issue legally.

“However, it is important that the public is warned about being conned.”

Righard Roets, 23, claimed that a piece of his brain was inexplicably removed during an alleged botched surgery to repair a brain haemorrhage.

READ MORE: Man missing piece of his brain after alleged botched surgery in Pretoria

Roets started a Back-a-Buddy account to assist in his attempt in paying for surgery to repair the damage to his brain.

Roets confirmed to Rekord that he did use a different name at the hospital.

“I used the name Righard Niemand, but that is because it is my birth name and stated as such on my ID document.”

Roets said that on Tuesday, 12 January, after consulting with a neurosurgeon from a private hospital, he was informed that a piece of his brain was removed during a surgery to repair a massive brain bleed called a chronic subdural haemorrhage.

“Doing the operation at a private hospital will cost a maximum of R200 000. That is a lot of money, which I do not have but I am willing to do whatever it takes to get my life back to a normal and healthy state again,” Roets said.

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Mathebula concluded by saying the internal investigation proved to be in contradiction with what Roets said.

“The internal investigation found that the patient was treated very well by SBAH with the best outcome. There is no botched surgery about it,” he concluded.

This article was republished from Rekord East with permission 

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