Lauren Beukes
1 minute read
24 Sep 2019
1:09 pm

What chewing gum does to your body

Lauren Beukes

John B. Curtis developed and sold the first commercial chewing gum called The State of Maine Pure Spruce Gum.

Picture: iStock

Chewing gum has been part of the world’s history since 1848 when the New England settlers watched American Indians chew on chewed resin made from sap of spruce trees.  In 1848, John B. Curtis developed and sold the first commercial chewing gum called The State of Maine Pure Spruce Gum.

The act of chewing quickly became a worldwide phenomea and shows no sign of slowing down in the near future.

Did you know it’s banned in Singapore!

BUT

What does chewing gum do to your body? Is it harmful if done excessively?

According to Mercola.com  

  • Chewing gum may help you to eat less, but the food you do eat may be less nutritious.
  • People who chewed gum were less likely to eat fruit and instead were more motivated to eat junk food like potato chips and candy.
  • Chewing gum causes you to swallow excess air, which can contribute to abdominal pain and bloating, along with other gastrointestinal issues.
  • Chewing gum (including sugar-free gum) may cause tooth decay and erosion and may cause mercury to be released from your mercury fillings.
  • Most chewing gum contains artificial sweeteners that may damage your health, even if it’s not sugar-free

WATCH: What will happen if you swallowed gum

Originally appeared on Southlands Sun

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