Tshwane ready to generate its own power

Tshwane ready to generate its own power

Tshwane. File image: iStock

The metro said Rooiwal and Pretoria West power stations could generate up to 480 megawatts of power once tenders for the supply of heavy-duty oil and coal were awarded.

The Tshwane metro could generate its own power and end its dependence on Eskom, it was revealed this week, reports Pretoria North Rekord.

According to metro spokesperson Lindela Mashigo, the Rooiwal and Pretoria West power stations could generate power once tenders for the supply of heavy-duty oil and coal were awarded.

The metro was busy with repairing the turbines at the stations, he said.

The stations would be ready to generate once coal, oil and water were secured.

He said the stations could generate up to 480 megawatts when they were running at full load.

He said Tshwane was one of the metros that would be able to procure power from independent power producers (IPPs).

IPPs are part of the measures government planned to implement in a bid to change energy generation in the country.

“The opportunity to procure from IPPs means a reduction in bulk purchase from Eskom.

“The city is in good financial standing to procure from anyone through competitive pricing,” he said.

The metro would have to go on the “open market” to seek IPPs, he added.

“This process requires the city to go out of section 33 to consult with residents before entering into an agreement to demonstrate the benefits of procuring over a longer period,” Mashigo said.

During his state of the nation address last week, President Cyril Ramaphosa said government would put measures in place to allow municipalities in good financial standing to procure their own power from IPPs.

In his speech, Ramaphosa admitted load shedding had had a debilitating effect on the country and set back efforts to rebuild the economy and create jobs.

“Every time it occurs, it disrupts people’s lives, causing frustration, inconvenience and hardship,” he said.

“At its core, load shedding is the inevitable consequences of Eskom’s inability over many years – due to debt, lack of capacity and state capture – to service its power plants.”

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