‘Formidable’ former SA Human Rights Commissioner Danny Titus dies

Dr Danny Titus, former CEO: Corporate Affairs at the Afrikaanse Taal- en Kultuurvereniging (ATKV) and former part-time commissioner at the South African Human Rights Commission. Photo: Twitter/@ATKVSA

Titus had been in a coma since the end of July after complications arose during an operation to remove a cataract.

Dr Danny Titus, former CEO: Corporate Affairs at the Afrikaanse Taal- en Kultuurvereniging (ATKV) and former part-time commissioner at the South African Human Rights Commission, died on Friday at the age of 63.

Titus had been in a coma since the end of July after complications arose during an operation to remove a cataract.

Managing director of the ATKV Sonél Brits said his death left a big void and that it was a sad day.

According to Brits, Titus left deep footprints in periods of change, both in South Africa and at the ATKV. His leadership, integrity and empathy will always remain with her.

“He was the right man at the right time.”

For the past 12 years, he had been campaigning for language and culture, Brits said.

“The legacy of this lawyer, linguist, historian and opinion maker is one of greater understanding and inclusivity across racial boundaries.”

In 1983, Titus was admitted as an advocate of what was then known as the Supreme Court. He worked as a public prosecutor at the Department of Justice.

He went to the Netherlands in 1987 to continue his studies at the University of Leiden and returned to South Africa in 1993 with master’s and doctorate degrees.

In February 2020, he received the Freedom of the Town as part of his hometown Worcester’s 200th anniversary celebrations.

“Our prayers go out especially to his two daughters, Daléne and Neriska,” said Brits.

“We are going to miss you, Dr Titus, and we say goodbye to you with great respect and gratitude for the difference you have made and the lives you have touched.”

For more news your way, download The Citizen’s app for iOS and Android.




today in print

today in print