Kataza ‘not in immediate danger’, says SPCA after the baboon was ‘mauled’

Kataza the baboon. Image: Facebook / Cape of Good Hope SPCA

‘The veterinarian also concluded that it is unsafe to dart Kataza at this time,’ says the Cape of Good Hope SPCA.

Having been relocated to Tokai by the City of Cape Town’s baboon management team, Human and Wildlife Solutions (HWS) last month, Kataza the baboon is back in the spotlight after the animal was reportedly mauled by an alpha male on Saturday.

The exact details around the incident remains unclear, however, the animal is not in immediate danger as a result of the injuries he sustained according to the Cape of Good Hope Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA).

The Cape of Good Hope said in a Facebook post that the baboon, also known as SK11, was treated by a private veterinarian, who assessed the injuries he sustained.

“The Cape of Good Hope’s Wildlife Department worked with the City in order to get a veterinarian to assess the extent of Kataza’s injuries.

“The private veterinarian that visually assessed Kataza made the conclusion that he is not in immediate danger as a result of the injuries he sustained.

“The veterinarian also concluded that it is unsafe to dart Kataza at this time. The veterinarian will return tomorrow morning to re-evaluate Kataza and a decision will then be made on the way forward,” the organisation said.

The Cape of Good Hope SPCA is aware of Kataza and the injuries he sustained earlier today. Our Wildlife Department is…

Posted by Cape of Good Hope SPCA on Saturday, 10 October 2020

 

The Cape Town metro came under fire for relocating the baboon, which is known for its capacity to “break the line” of HWS rangers when leading its troop on raids in Kommetjie on the Cape Peninsula.

Residents have been calling on the City to move Kataza “bring back” as they fear that the City was planning another attempt to euthanise the animal.

Kataza had been reprieved from a death sentence after HWS applied to the City to euthanise the baboon in July this year.

Kommetjie resident Bradley Thorsen argued “relocating an adult male doesn’t go down well because he will not easily integrate into a different troop”.

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