IN PICS: Joburg preschoolers march to save the planet

IN PICS: Joburg preschoolers march to save the planet

Children from Mimosa pre primary take place in the global general strike together with more than a million children in New York alone, as well as climate activists around the world, 20 September 2019. Picture: Tracy Lee Stark

Students from the UK, Australia, Germany, South Africa, India, Greece and Turkey, just to name a few, have been marching since early on Friday morning.

Students from around the world have joined forces to march for their future.

Donning adorable placards with serious messages, children from Mimosa pre-primary school in Johannesburg have joined the global movement.

Children from Mimosa pre-primary take place in the global general strike together with more than a million children in New York alone, as well as climate activists around the world, 20 September 2019. Picture: Tracy Lee Stark

The strike is expected to be the biggest day of climate strikes in the history of the earth. Picture: Tracy Lee Stark

More than 1 million children in New York alone are expected to embark on the worldwide demonstrations, along with 150 other countries.

Students from the UK, Australia, Germany, South Africa, India, Greece and Turkey, just to name a few, have been marching since early on Friday morning.

Today’s strike is organised by school students with 16-year-old Greta Thunberg leading the demonstrations. Picture: Tracy Lee Stark

The Global Climate Strike website says the strike is aimed at dealing mainly with encouraging countries to move away from fossil fuels.

“The climate crisis won’t wait, so neither will we,” their slogan reads.

Picture: Tracy Lee Stark

The world’s youthful climate change advocate, 16-year-old Greta Thunberg, has inspired youths and parents across the globe to join her cause. This has not only set her up as a potential 2019 Nobel Peace Prize laureate, but has inspired the youth to fight for their future.

Picture: Tracy Lee Stark

Debilitating climate change is happening at an unprecedented rate, and will likely affect young people in their lifetime, she told Trevor Noah in an interview on the Daily Show, just after she disembarked from a zero-emissions boat she took to get from Sweden to New York.

Greta plans to continue her mission to change the world’s mindset on just how serious climate change is, at least until Sweden is in line with the Paris agreement, “and that might take a while”, she told AFP TV late last year.

Additional reporting by AFP

(Compiled by Nica Schreuder)

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