Citizen reporter
2 minute read
14 Dec 2020
1:58 pm

SA universities raise more than R1.5 billion in donations

Citizen reporter

Corporates contributed 30% of philanthropic income in 2018, compared to 14% in 2013, while individual donors (including bequestors) increased funding from 4% in 2013 to 8% in 2018.

Picture: iStock

South African universities have raised more than a billion rands in philanthropic support, according to the latest Annual Survey of Philanthropy in Higher Education (ASPIHE).

The survey, conducted in 2019 and based on data from the 2018 calendar year, indicated that 11 universities raised an impressive R1.61 billion in 2018, which increases to a total of R1.91 billion when income from Sector Education and Training Authorities (Setas) was added.

Out of the 26 universities in South Africa – the 11 that took part were the Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT); University of Cape Town (UCT); Durban University of Technology (DUT); University of the Free State (UFS); University of Johannesburg (UJ); University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN); University of Pretoria (UP); University of Stellenbosch (SU); Tshwane University of Technology (TUT); University of the Western Cape (UWC); and the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits).

“A total of 10,945 donors made philanthropic contributions to the 11 institutions, compared with 4355 donors in 2013 when the sample was 10 institutions,” lead researcher at ASPIHE, Sean Jones, said.

Jones further said there was an increase of 1588 donors in the latest results compared to the previous years, and between 2017 and 2018. Jones said the largest proportion of philanthropic income came from trusts and foundations which contributed 48%.

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Corporates contributed 30% of philanthropic income in 2018, compared to 14% in 2013, while individual donors (including bequestors) increased funding from 4% in 2013 to 8% in 2018.

“Collectively, figures suggest that increasing numbers of South African individuals and organisations are giving significantly more funding to HEIs [higher education institutions] than six years ago. South African donors accounted for 92 % of all donors in the sample compared with 87% in 2013.”

Jones said non-traditional universities were generally more successful at attracting Seta funding.

Inyathelo executive director, Nazeema Mohamed, said the sector was now facing the challenge of reaching out to the 15 other universities that were not part of the annual survey of philanthropy, to enlist their participation.

“Through USAf [Universities South Africa], Inyathelo will be tasked with providing advancement training via the Higher Education Leadership Management Programme [HELM].”

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Mohamed said they had also been asked by the Department of Higher Education and Training to participate in the Historically Disadvantaged Institutions (HDIs) Capacity Development Programme.

“We have been tasked with drafting a concept document on third stream income which will include technology transfer and entrepreneurship in universities.

“The aim is to work towards the inclusion of all 26 universities in the ASPIHE publication,” she said.

Compiled by Marizka Coetzer

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