Nica Richards
Premium Journalist
1 minute read
11 May 2021
12:48 pm

Road spiking incidents on the rise – here are the hotspots

Nica Richards

Spiking involves putting spikes on roads to puncture tyres, forcing motorists to stop. Once they get out of their vehicles, they are robbed. 

A tyre spike used in spiking incidents. Picture: Tshwane Metro Police Department

Incidents involving the spiking of unsuspecting motorists, particularly in the Tshwane area, are once again on the rise. 

For years, road spikes have added to the ever-growing list of hazards motorists face, often daily. 

Spiking involves putting spikes on roads to puncture tyres, forcing motorists to stop. Once they stop and get out of their vehicles, they are robbed. 

According to GAC Safety Solutions, there were four spiking incidents on the N4 near the Diamond Hill plaza and on the N1 on Saturday alone. 

Last month, Cullinan Community Policing Forum chair Karen Yssel told The Citizen that at one stage, spiking incidents were occurring daily. 

The Lyttleton Community Policing Forum has compiled a tentative list of spiking hot spots. 

N4 highway – Pretoria to Witbank 

  • Donkerhoek Plaza – 7pm to 4am;
  • Solomon Mahlangu interchange – 11pm to 4am; 
  • Proefplaas interchange – 7pm to 4am.

N4 Brits

  • M17 at Garankua Bridge – 11pm to 4am;
  • R101 Old Warmbaths road – 3am;
  • R80 Hercules to Soshanguve – isolated incidents.

N1 North and N1 South 

  • Pumalani at Walmansthal on- and off-ramps. 

According to the CPF, the modus operandi includes strategically placing stones in the road, or throwing them off bridges onto unsuspecting vehicles. 

Cars broken down on the side of the road are at particularly high risk of becoming victims. 

The CPF said motorists must try to avoid hot spots after dark. 

If your tyres have been spiked, do not stop, even if this means driving on the rims. Drive as far as you can in the direction of a more public area or to a police station.