Churches plan code of conduct to rein in ‘prophets’

Churches plan code of conduct to rein in ‘prophets’

Prophet Phara doing what he does best - poisoning his congregants with Jik. Image: Twitter/@yawazobiafm

The CRL said last year ‘pastors’ were making people eat snakes, grass and hair, drink Jeyes fluid, and spraying them with Doom insect killer.

Amid “prophet” Rufus Phala’s ongoing antics, numerous religious organisations met to discuss setting up an umbrella body to encompass representation of all faiths and following a code of conduct.

Phala, who has been slammed for giving his congregants Dettol to drink, allegedly also gave them bleach to drink about a week ago during a “service” at the Ark Centre Ministry in Makgodu village outside Polokwane in Limpopo, the Daily Sun reported.

“There are reports some have died,” said the Commission for the Promotion and Protection of Cultural, Religious and Linguistic Communities (CRL) commissioner Thoko Mkhwanazi-Xaluva.

“The system is getting worse rather than better.”

The commissioner has been hauled over the coals for suggesting the cooperative governance and traditional affairs portfolio committee had failed to act on the CRL’s recommendations, especially after the Seven Angels Ministries debacle in Engcobo in which seven suspects in the murder of five police officers and a soldier were killed.

Pastor Ray McCauley estimated more than 140 000 groups parading as religious organisations were not registered as non-profit organisations and were sending bags full of money out of SA.

He said it was “vitally important” the religious sector work with the SA Revenue Service. “Then they would have order on the basis of the constitution and be accountable for what they are doing.”

The CRL said last year that “pastors” were making people eat snakes, grass and hair, drink Jeyes fluid, lie down for cars to be driven over them and spraying them with Doom insect killer.

amandw@citizen.co.za

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