South Africa 4.9.2018 10:06 am

DA claims to have saved R18bn from corruption in Joburg since taking over

Executive Mayor Herman Mashaba hands over four new fire engines to Joburg’s Emergency Management Services. Photo: Enoch Lehung/City of Johannesburg

Executive Mayor Herman Mashaba hands over four new fire engines to Joburg’s Emergency Management Services. Photo: Enoch Lehung/City of Johannesburg

John Moodey claims under the ANC nearly a fifth of the city’s funds were being ‘stolen’.

According to the DA’s Gauteng leader John Moodey, the DA-led coalition government in the City of Johannesburg has saved residents more than R18 billion in just under two years by “exposing fraud and corruption in the city”.

He said the city had allocated R38 million towards the fight against corruption during the 2016/17 financial year, and the internal anti-corruption unit, launched two years ago, was investigating more than 3,500 corruption cases.

“This anti-corruption unit has made significant progress in building relationships with law enforcement authorities to have cases effectively prosecuted.”

He said measures had led to the arrests of 700 people for alleged corruption, the dismissal of 28 city employees and the suspension of another 18.

“More than 30 cases are currently before the courts and 25 hijacked properties have been returned to their rightful owners.

“We are investing a huge amount of time and effort into stamping out corruption and are committed to ensuring that those who steal public funds are held accountable.”

He alleged that they had uncovered that under the ANC, which formerly governed the city, 19% of the city’s budget was “stolen through corruption”.

“This included R6 million that was used to purchase 500 computers that were never delivered, R80 million worth of City Power equipment that has been seized from sub-contractors and a R28 million revenue refunds scam, through which city officials wrote off residents rates and tax bills in exchange for bribes.

“Databases of indigent residents have also been cleaned up, removing the names of hundreds of city and government officials who were benefiting improperly from services that were meant to go to the poor.

“Money previously lost through corrupt activities is now being put to good use and spent on fast-tracking services for millions of poor people in Johannesburg.”

 

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