Details: How Zuma will avoid his day in court

President Jacob Zuma addressing the media at the Kgosi Mampuru Correctional Services Prison during the 40th anniversary of the death of anti-apartheid activist Steve Biko, 12 September 2017, Pretoria. Picture: Jacques Nelles

President Jacob Zuma addressing the media at the Kgosi Mampuru Correctional Services Prison during the 40th anniversary of the death of anti-apartheid activist Steve Biko, 12 September 2017, Pretoria. Picture: Jacques Nelles

By conceding that dropping 783 charges of corruption against Zuma was irrational, Zuma’s lawyers effectively paved the way for the NPA to handle the case.

The decision to brand former NPA boss Mokotedi Mpshe’s move to completely drop the charges “irrational” was a ploy by Zuma’s advocate Kemp J Kemp to have the case back in the hands of the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) under the authority of NPA head Shaun Abrahams.

According to City Press, Abrahams discussed Zuma’s case with several of his top colleagues with a plan in mind to hear representations from Adv Kemp J Kemp.

If the Supreme Court of Appeal grants that the case can be heard by the NPA and for Zuma’s legal team to make fresh representations, Abrahams would defend legal challenges from the DA and civil organisations and eventually grant Zuma a permanent stay of prosecution, the weekly reports.

“This is going to be a lengthy and protracted legal battle. They anticipate the DA and civil society to press on with their fight,” a source reportedly said.

NPA spokesperson Luvuyo Mfaku said this was, however, a load of rubbish intended to bring the integrity of the NPA into question.

“These baseless allegations are intended to poison the mind of the citizenry and attack the integrity of the NPA before the judgment is even delivered,” he said.

Meanwhile, legal expert William Booth told The Citizen the spy tapes case would not be an easy one for Zuma’s advocates to win.

“The NPA’s argument must be particularly solid in the law and the facts. Their lawyers must show the SCA that the high court’s ruling must be set aside due to there being errors in law and the facts,” he added.

“They must show the court had misdirected itself and committed an irregularity based on the facts. You will have to do a good job in convincing the judges.”

Supreme court to hear latest round in long-running case on Zuma charges




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