South Africa 16.3.2017 05:51 am

City of Tshwane lays charges against ANC over ‘violent’ cemetery protest

Police stock image

Police stock image

This after Mike Mkhari and Rachel Mathebe were barred from officially opening the Klip-Kruisfontein Cemetery by ANC members.

The City of Tshwane strongly condemned the violent protest action witnessed at the Klip-Kruisfontein Cemetery in Soshanguve wherein the MMC for agriculture and environmental management, councillor Mike Mkhari, and speaker of the council, councillor Rachel Mathebe, were barred by the ANC members from officially opening the cemetery.

They have subsequently filed a case of assault, malicious damage to property and public violence with the Akasia police station, north of Pretoria.

Mayor Solly Msimanga said Mkhari and Mathebe were essentially stopped from performing their official duties of handing over the burial site as mandated by the electorate.

“This behaviour is disingenuous and must be condemned in the strongest possible terms.”

The shenanigan was repeated at Soshanguve during an imbizo called by MEC Paul Mashatile where the mayor was shown the door.

Msimanga said they wish to reiterate that this administration is committed to serving the people of Tshwane and that protest gimmicks will not deter them from continuing with their development agenda.

“Despite the unjustified protest, we are happy to inform Soshanguve residents that the cemetery is open.

“They are also going to pay much less at the new cemetery than what they are used to paying,” Msimanga said.

He added that the city is also in the process of handing out title deeds to more than 4 000 people in Eersterust, Olievenhoutbosch, Mamelodi and other communities in about a week’s time,” the mayor said.

“We believe that we can bring about the conditions that will draw investment, stimulate economic activity and create jobs.”

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