It’s sad to see tennis ace Murray go like this

Andy Murray of Great Britain breaks down during a press conference in Melbourne where he announced he will retire this year . AFP/William WEST

Andy Murray of Great Britain breaks down during a press conference in Melbourne where he announced he will retire this year . AFP/William WEST

It was heart-rending to see Andy Murray fighting off the tears about his enduring physical pain.

Modern sport is all about drama, much of it contrived.

So it was heart-rending to see Scots tennis star Andy Murray fighting off the tears at a press conference at which he announced this is probably his last year in the professional game.

Murray was the first British man to win Wimbledon in 77 years and battled his way to the top in an era where some of the finest players in the history of the game – Roger Federer, Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal – were his opponents.

The 31-year-old has been battling for some time with a serious hip injury, which forced him to take time out for surgery last year.

After coming back to the court in June last year, he admitted: “I can play with limitations. But having the limitations and the pain is not allowing me to enjoy competing or training.”

He said he hopes to make it to Wimbledon again this year, but realistically, the upcoming Australian Open may be his last tournament.

Murray’s physical demise is a reminder about the physical demands of sport at the highest level – big rewards, but equally big risks.

It will be sad to see the pugnacious Scot go.

For more news your way, download The Citizen’s app for iOS and Android.




today in print