Editorials 30.1.2017 05:30 am

Self-interest will be the motivation

File picture: In this Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2016 file photo, US President Donald Trump listens to a question as he speaks to reporters at Mar-a-Lago, in Palm Beach, Fla. The 18-hole golf course in Dubai bearing Donald Trumps name exemplifies the questions surrounding his international business interests. The course will open in February 2017 in the United Arab Emirates, but concerns about security, financial agreements and other matters have yet to be answered by the incoming 45th American president. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

File picture: In this Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2016 file photo, US President Donald Trump listens to a question as he speaks to reporters at Mar-a-Lago, in Palm Beach, Fla. The 18-hole golf course in Dubai bearing Donald Trumps name exemplifies the questions surrounding his international business interests. The course will open in February 2017 in the United Arab Emirates, but concerns about security, financial agreements and other matters have yet to be answered by the incoming 45th American president. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

It is self-evident that the prime consideration for any political leader is the overall welfare of the nation.

The White House meeting between US President Donald Trump and British Prime Minister Theresa May reveals an underlying meeting of minds between the two world leaders.

It is self-evident that the prime consideration for any political leader is the overall welfare of the nation – the entire nation, those who have their unqualified mandate, as well as those who do not.

It is equally clear that two of the most important aspects of this guardianship are national safety and economic strength.

On the first criterion, May’s obligation to implement Brexit and Trump’s campaign promise of erecting fences of exclusion by mimicking the disastrous social consequences of the Berlin Wall by the forcible prescription of Mexican illegals and his avowed intention to veto Muslim immigrants, are not that far apart.

Both lines of thought were carried to fruition on a wave of largely understated xenophobia within the two separate electorates – in Britain a flood of opendoor admissions from European Union citizens seeking British benefits and in America by the threat of job shrinkage in an often uncompetitive US industry, fuelled by cheaper foreign goods.

But it is also certain that the second factor – concern for the dual economies – will become the crucial pivot.

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