Eish! 28.11.2016 02:24 pm

WATCH: Jeremy Clarkson makes fun of Zuma’s counting problem

Photo: Top Gear

Photo: Top Gear

He told his audience that it would take the president ‘ten-hundred and three-hundred seconds to jump into his fire pool’ in case of a fire.

President Jacob Zuma’s maths impediment has made its way on to UK TV screens and he has no one to blame for it but The Grand Tour and former Top Gear presenters Jeremy Clarkson, James May and Richard Hammond.

The trio kicked off their show with a topic on the evolution of humans and the Cradle of Humankind, and called it ground zero, saying all of human history began there.

Zuma’s counting problem came into it when Hammond asked Clarkson how long he thought it took for humans to evolve from being apes.

“It’s taken 2 million and a hundred years,” was his answer.

“While the rest of mankind has managed to grasp the concept of arithmetic, the president of South Africa, Jacob Zuma, well … how can I put this? He sort of hasn’t.”

He continued to play a video clip of the president struggling to tell acrowd how many members the ANC had garnered. The video left Clarkson’s audience in laughter.

Clarkson further commented on the president’s fire pool, calling him a “bit of a controversial figure” who installed the pool using taxpayers’ money.

“He recently installed a swimming pool at his home and then, because he used taxpayers’ money to do that, he said it was actually a water-storage facility in case of a fire.

“So in other words if he could burst into flames he could jump into the pool and put himself out in ten-hundred and three-hundred seconds.”

Adding to what Clarkson was saying about the president calling his swimming pool a fire pool, Hammond said Zuma had also bought himself what he claims is a fire engine (showing a picture of a red Ferrari), while May added that he got himself an ambulance (showing a picture of a white Lamborghini).

Watch the video below:

The president had earlier also made himself a laughing stock after saying Africa was the biggest continent in the world.

 

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