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News24 Wire
1 minute read
24 Sep 2019
7:21 pm

Prince Harry’s visit to Kalk Bay puts the spotlight on abalone poaching

News24 Wire

Last week the City of Cape Town also launched three new custom-designed boats in an attempt to help save and protect marine life.

Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex, centre, meeting the City of Cape Town Marine Unit in Kalk Bay on September 24, 2019 in Cape Town, South Africa. The Cape Town Marine Unit travelled with the Duke to the Seal Island, where they briefed His Royal Highness on their role in combatting the poaching of abalone, considered one of South Africa’s most significant illegal wildlife trade concerns. Picture: Gallo Images / Jeffrey Abrahams

In August 2018, the UK Ministry of Defence deployed a UK Military short-term training team to work with the Cape Town Maritime Police Unit (MPU) to improve their boat handling skills, confidence on the water, and operational effectiveness.

The Duke of Sussex, who was appointed Captain General Royal Marines in December 2017 by Her Majesty the Queen, met with the team in Kalk Bay on Tuesday during his royal tour to South Africa.

Since the UK Military’s deployment, the MPU have detained a number of abalone smugglers in the Cape Town area who were operating at night.

Harry then travelled out to sea in the direction of Seal Island, an abalone poaching hot spot, to find out how the Royal Marine training has benefitted the MPU and received further updates on recent seizures and arrests made in the area.

Mayco member for safety and security, JP Smith, provided the royal with broader context on the illegal wildlife poaching.

Harry paused for a group photo before departing to his next engagement.

Last week the City of Cape Town also launched three new custom-designed boats in an attempt to help save and protect marine life.

After the launch, the multimillion-rand inflatable vessels underwent a two-hour-long test at the Ocean Power Boat Club in Green Point. The marine and environmental law enforcement unit now has eight rubber ducks in their fleet of watercraft.

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