Emissions ends Toyota Prado in China: beginning of the end ahead of all-new model?

Its axing could serve as a catalyst for other markets to commence the phasing out process.

The Toyota Land Cruiser Prado has become one of the latest models to fall foul of new emissions regulations in China. According to Auto News, the Prado, which in its current J150 guise has been around for eleven years, has been facing the axing since the new regulations were drawn three years ago, due to its combined consumption being over 11 L/100 km and, according to Auto Home, similarities with the Middle East spec version where emissions are not as strict.

Build by First Automotive Works (FAW) in partnership with Toyota, the final Prado reportedly rolled-off of the Sichuan Plant’s line this past Tuesday (23 June) after seven years and 346 706 units. Bespoke to China, until the unveiling of the new HiAce (Quantum) last year, was the Prado’s engine. A replacement for the well-known 4.0-litre V6 petrol, the 3.5-litre bent-six produced 206kW/365Nm and served as the supplement powerunit to the entry-level 2.7-litre petrol offered at the time.

Although the Prado’s end in China will have no bearing on the models sold in South Africa, where the now dated 3.0 D-4D turbodiesel continues to be offered alongside the mentioned 4.0-litre petrol, its axing could serve as a catalyst for other markets to commence the phasing out process in light of the all-new model reportedly arriving in 2022.

On course to debut a year after the Land Cruiser 300, the Prado will reportedly move to a version of the TNGA platform, likely to be the same as its senior sibling, thus keeping the ladder-frame chassis with seating for five or seven. Despite details being shrouded in mystery, the Prado is anticipated to keep the current line-up of petrol and diesel engines, but it remains to be seen how these will fall in-line with Toyota’s all model electrification switch come 2025.

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