Charl Bosch
Online Motoring Reporter
2 minute read
4 Jun 2021
1:08 pm

Fiat flicking the all-electric switch from 2025

Charl Bosch

Italian marque expected to roll-out more electric vehicles over the coming years.

All-electric new Fiat 500

Fiat has become the latest European automaker to announce that it will be going fully electric before the expected ban on internal combustion engines in some parts of the Old Continent in 2030.

In a lengthy statement, the Stellantis owned marque’s CEO, Olivier Francois, said a decision had been taken to make Fiat a wholly plugged-in brand between 2025 and 2030 as part of a new strategy called “New Renaissance”.

“It is our duty to bring to market electric cars that cost no more than those with an internal combustion engine, as soon as we can, in line with the falling costs of batteries,” Francois said.

We are exploring the territory of sustainable mobility for all: this is our greatest project. Between 2025 and 2030, our product line-up will gradually become electric-only. This will be a radical change for Fiat”.

RELATED: All-new Fiat 500 makes electric transition

According to the former Fiat-Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) CEO, the switch had already commenced with the unveiling of the new 500 last year as it was decided from the onset, before the impact of Covd-19, that it would no longer have the option of an internal combustion engine.

“(Before Covid-19), we were already aware that the world could not take any more ‘compromises’. In fact, lockdown was only the latest of the warnings we have received,” Francois continued.

“We have an icon, the 500. An icon always has its cause and the 500 is no exception: in the 1950s, it opened access to mobility for all. Nowadays, in this new scenario, it has a new mission – our mission – to create sustainable mobility for all”.

Aside from the 500, a number of new models are expected over the coming months and years with rumours of the next all-electric model potentially being the all-new Panda. However, this is purely speculative and could well be proven otherwise in due course.