Home Life 22.10.2013 06:00 am

Hop couture

Killer Kermit. This file photo shows a poisonous cane toad sitting on a keeper's hand at the Taronga Zoo in Sydney.

Killer Kermit. This file photo shows a poisonous cane toad sitting on a keeper's hand at the Taronga Zoo in Sydney.

What do you do when you find out thatAustralian cane toads, a poisonous species, is becoming a menace to other animals in Australia? You turn them into fashionable accessories.

Monika Jarosz, who runs fashion house Kobja, has created a line of bags, purses and accessories incorporating toad hides. The Polish designer channelled her love for fairy tales to create the line, which caters for both men and women.

handy hoppers. Toads make striking add-ons to a range of trendy handbags.

handy hoppers. Toads make striking add-ons to a range of trendy handbags.

According to her website, the line took months of research to create. Jarosz only works with complete toad skins, which are tanned by taxidermists. The entire process has a whopping 14 stages and the skins are then stitched and turned into trendy items at Jarosz’s workshop in Paris.

Cane toads are literally decimating other wildlife in Australia.

According to National Geographic, the South American amphibians were introduced to the area in 1935 in an attempt to control the destructive cane beetle population. The plan backfired and now the toads are becoming a national nuisance to animals and humans alike. The toads are currently being selectively eliminated in certain areas.

Lined up for luxury. Australian cane toads are displayed after being tinged in red at Alric tannery, owned by Jean-Charles Duchene.

Lined up for luxury. Australian cane toads are displayed after being tinged in red at Alric tannery, owned by Jean-Charles Duchene.

So while animal rights groups may cringe at the sight of the trend-setting toads adorning brightly coloured bags and belts, they should be pleased that a use has been found for them – albeit posthumously.

 

 

 

 

 

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