Music 30.5.2016 03:28 pm

Unisa Music Foundation brings major help to minors

A student follows his tutors instructions carefully during his lesson at the Kingdom Of Life centre. Pictures by Jacques Nelles

A student follows his tutors instructions carefully during his lesson at the Kingdom Of Life centre. Pictures by Jacques Nelles

The foundation is committed to, through music, bringing social change in the lives of South Africans who do not have access to it.

The programme serves a number of students from disadvantaged backgrounds countrywide and provides tutors, instruments and lessons to those who do not have the finances to get training in music. Many students who started out in the project have developed their skills to the point that they are embarking on professional careers in music.

The training, in Atteridgeville at The Kingdom of Life Centre and Leamogetswe Safety Home, teaches dedication to hundreds of orphans every year. The programme successfully betters the lives of students and produces musical professionals.

The children’s musical skills develop quickly, other than this program and school, they have little contact with the world beyond home. Picture: Jacques Nelles

PULLING STRINGS. The children’s musical skills develop quickly. Other than the programme and school, the children have little contact with the world.

The Kingdom of Life centre branched out due to extra funding and a building upgrade. The children moved from Atteridgeville to Centurion. Newly orphaned children will soon fill the new building in Atteridgeville. Children at Kingdom of Life play along with their violin instructor. Unisa sponsors a music program where the children begin at a very early age to learn music. Picture: Jacques Nelles

MAESTRO. The Kingdom of Life Centre branched out due to extra funding and a building upgrade. Newly orphaned children will soon fill the new building in Atteridgeville. Children at Kingdom of Life play along with their violin instructor. Unisa sponsors a music programme where the children begin at an early age to learn music.

A boy plays in the music room at Leamogetswe safety home prior to the start of class. Picture: Jacques Nelles

MONSTER GRIN. A boy plays in the music room at Leamogetswe Safety Home prior to the start of class.

A boy takes out his violin before lessons start at the Kingdom Of Life centre. He spends most of his free time practicing for his next lesson. Picture: Jacques Nelles Introduction: The Unisa Music Foundation (UMF) is committed to bringing social change through music in the lives of South Africans who do not have access to it. This programme serves a number of students from disadvantaged backgrounds from across South Africa and provides tutors, instruments and lessons to these students who do not have the financial capability to obtain training in music. Many students who started out in the project have developed their skills to the point that they are embarking on professional careers in music. The programme in Atteridgeville at The Kingdom of life centre and Leamogetswe Safety Home fulfils the needs for learning and teaches dedication to hundreds of orphans every year. The program successfully betters the lives and warms the hearts of students and eventually produces musical professionals like never before.

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT. A boy takes out his violin before lessons start at the Kingdom Of Life Centre. He spends most of his free time practising.

A students walk to class. Unisa sponsors violins for the children. Picture: Jacques Nelles

CLASS ACT. A student walks to class. Unisa sponsors violins.

Two students warm-up at Leamogetswe safety home prior to the start of class, often there are those that excel and end up playing in orchestras and furthering a career, they become very attached to their music. Picture: Jacques Nelles

ANYTHING YOU CAN DO. Two students warm up at Leamogetswe Safety Home before the start of class. Some children excel and end up playing in orchestras.

A girl plays in the music room at Leamogetswe safety home prior to the start of class. They house 82 children, their ages range from 1 to 20 years old. Picture: Jacques Nelles

TICKLING THE IVORIES. A girl plays in the music room at Leamogetswe Safety Home. The home houses 82 children, ranging from one year to 20 years.

Students practice outside, near and around the orphanages in Atteridgeville there always seems to be the sound of a violin playing. Picture: Jacques Nelles

SOUND OF MUSIC. Students practice outside, near and around the orphanages in Atteridgeville. There always seems to be the sound of a violin playing.

Kingdom of Life Child and Youth care centre prior to the rebuild housed an average of 60 children in this home. Picture: Jacques Nelles

A PLACE CALLED HOME. Kingdom of Life Child and Youth Care Centre, prior to the rebuild, houses an average of 60 children.

 

 

 

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