SABC launches model to reinvent and revamp itself

The SABC offices in Auckland Park, Johannesburg. Photo: Karen Sandison / African News Agency (ANA)

Mmoni Seapolelo said the turnaround strategy is due to the changing business requirements, market conditions, and meeting the ever-fluid customer needs. 

The South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) says their new target operating model will allow them to reinvent the public broadcaster, especially during the current difficult economic times and changing viewing patterns.

The operating model has been developed in response to the national Treasury bailout preconditions, who granted them a R3.2-million bailout.

Acting spokesperson for the SABC Mmoni Seapolelo said the turnaround strategy is due to the changing business requirements, market conditions, and meeting the ever-fluid customer needs.

“This strategic renewal initiative is aimed at overhauling the SABC into a fit for purpose public broadcasting service that is financially sustainable self-sufficient and appropriate capacitated to execute its mandate effectively.”

SABC economic difficulties have been well documented for years and the Covid-19 has added extra pressure on their economic downturn and increasing competition from streaming services such as Netflix and with more customers moving to paid-for content, the broadcaster has to react.

Seapolelo says the model will provide an ideal business template, to create and support the long term success of the corporation.

When the model is implemented, it is expected to provide the guidelines to fulfil audience needs, their preferences, meet the demands of the competitive market, and respond timely to the changing business environment.

A skills audit process will also be underway to hire the right people for the job who have the matching skills to complete the tasks.

The public broadcaster has already started speaking to employees, labour representatives, and other key stakeholders of the ‘unavoidable and urgent’ revamp.

CEO of SABC Madoda Mxakwe said they acknowledge that the journey of structural changes will need collective consideration, cooperation, and calm, maintaining that the process is to ensure the longevity and sustainability of the SABC.

“We have an obligation to re-create a SABC that will outlive us, a SABC that will survive another 84 years and serve several generations to come.”

(Compiled by Sandisiwe Mbhele)

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