Disabled girl, family finally get a home

Nongaliphi Zenzisi with her daughter Aphelele Zenzisi and EC Human Settlement MEC Nonkqubela Peters.;
MMS Developments, from left to right Cobus Bodenstein, Mark Holloway, Taryn Nelson, Landi Kieck [CEO] Piet Tsotetsi [Builder] Shaun Steyn and Bathandwa Bele.

Nongaliphi Zenzisi with her daughter Aphelele Zenzisi and EC Human Settlement MEC Nonkqubela Peters.; MMS Developments, from left to right Cobus Bodenstein, Mark Holloway, Taryn Nelson, Landi Kieck [CEO] Piet Tsotetsi [Builder] Shaun Steyn and Bathandwa Bele.

Brigadier Phumla Mdlankomo noted the plight of the family when she was doing work in the Mooiplaas area. 

Worries about rainy days are a thing of the past for the Zenzisi family at Mooiplaas, outside East London. For years, the family, with 17-year-old disabled child Aphelele Zenzisi, lived in a shack which got flooded with water when it rained.

Aphelele’s mother, Nongaliphi Zenzisi, said their living conditions were dire, as their only source of income was a disability grant.

“I was hopeless because there are no housing projects in the area. I’m not working because I have this disabled child and the disability grant is not enough for our expenses. We could only put patches to the shack but when it rained it leaked,” said Zenzisi.

Brigadier Phumla Mdlankomo, a station commissioner at Cambridge Police Station in East London noted the plight of the family when she was doing work in the Mooiplaas area.

“I saw this child lying on the floor when I was in the area on the 20th of May and I was touched. I wrote to the provincial department of human settlements and painted the picture the way I saw it,” said Mdlankomo.

The Eastern Cape human settlements department requested construction company, MMS Developments, to build the 54 square metre house, which was custom made for the needs of a disabled person. It was constructed and completed in seven days.

MMS Developments CEO Landi Kieck: “It is very special for us to get involved in a project like this, it gives meaning to what we do. We also bought a small puppy for the girl. We named the puppy Ithemba, which means hope and we hope it will bring joy because puppies have [a] therapeutic influence on children, especially children that are living with disabilities.”

– African News Agency

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