South Africa 6.11.2013 05:00 am

Cosatu unveils plans for e-toll protest campaign

File photo. Anti e-tolling protestors are seen demonstrating under an e-toll gantry on the N1 South, 6 December 2012, during a drive slow protest. Picture: Refilwe Modise

File photo. Anti e-tolling protestors are seen demonstrating under an e-toll gantry on the N1 South, 6 December 2012, during a drive slow protest. Picture: Refilwe Modise

The Congress of SA Trade Unions in Gauteng is to embark on protest action against e-tolling, it was announced yesterday.

The trade union federation said it had “noted” the recent developments in relation to President Jacob Zuma’s signing of the Transport Laws and Related Matters Amendment Bill, which gives the go-ahead for e-tolling to commence.

Provincial secretary Dumisane Dakile said Cosatu was “annoyed and dismayed” at the developments which “will take our revolution backward and entrench a neo-liberal agenda in the country”.

“The e-toll campaign is a typical example of how the neo-liberal agenda is being pursued by the current administration which is the acceleration and consolidation of Gear policies,” he said.

Cosatu’s Gauteng provincial executive committee and its provincial shopsteward council has developed a programme of action in opposition to e-tolls.

On November 8, Cosatu would embark on a drive-slow targeting the M1, N1, N12 and M2 highways in Johannesburg. It would conduct the same form of protest in Ekurhuleni on the N3, R24 and R21 highways.

A stay-away would be scheduled for November 14.

“The details of the march are currently under discussion with the Johannesburg Metro Police Department. We will be meeting with the Metro police before the end of the week to finalise these details and such shall be communicated in due course,” the union said.

Dakile also asked the public not to purchase e-tags.

“The success of this system depends on the co-operation by the public and we must ensure that the system is rendered unworkable.”

Transport Minister Dipuo Peters has indicated that the controversial user-pay system is set to be rolled out at the end of this year.

 

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