Makhura’s office could face music

FILE PICTURE: Gauteng premier David Makhura. Picture: Werner Beukes/SAPA

FILE PICTURE: Gauteng premier David Makhura. Picture: Werner Beukes/SAPA

Gauteng Premier David Makhura’s office may have to face the music for under-spending its budget in the first quarter of the current financial year.

Godfrey Tsotetsi, chairperson of the oversight committee on the office of the premier (OoP) and the legislature, yesterday said that Makhura’s office had until the end of October to provide them with reasons.

“We want to know why and we will make recommendations,” said Tsotetsi. He revealed the under-expenditure in the legislature on September 17. Tsotetsi was presenting the quarterly assessment report for the 2015-16 financial year which covers the period from April 1 to June 30.

He said the office of the premier received an annual budget of R425.4 million but spent R66.1 million. Tsotetsi said this time the committee was concerned since the OoP did not achieve the ideal expenditure threshold of 25% of the annual budget.

“The committee is of the view that this could impact negatively on the budget variance and programme performance going forward,” said Tsotetsi.

“The committee notes that the OoP allocated R95.8 million for the implementation of the programmes and R66.1 million was spent, reflecting an under-expenditure of R29.7 million.” The programmes are administration, institutional development and integrity management as well as policy and governance.

According to Tsotetsi, the committee noted that the OoP has achieved 89% of the overall programme performance in the quarter under review. This includes, among others, 100% payment of service providers within 30 days.

However, the OoP’s poor performance with regards to the budget expenditure remained a concern to the committee, added Tsotetsi.

The OoP explained at the time that the R29 million under-expenditure was due to accruals from the processing of payments amounting to R4.5 million, added Tsotetsi. – warren@citizen.co.za

 

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