; Govt’s ‘order’ to arrest Bashir raises concerns – The Citizen

Govt’s ‘order’ to arrest Bashir raises concerns

FILE PICTURE: Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir looks on during a welcome ceremony in the capital Khartoum, on June 11, 2015.  AFP PHOTO / ASHRAF SHAZLY

FILE PICTURE: Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir looks on during a welcome ceremony in the capital Khartoum, on June 11, 2015. AFP PHOTO / ASHRAF SHAZLY

Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee on International Relations and Cooperation, Siphosezwe Masango, has voiced concerns on the court application to the North Gauteng High Court, to force the South African government to arrest Bashir.

This after the Southern Africa Litigation Centre brought the application while the Sudanese president Al Bashir was in the country attending the African Union’s (AU) week-long 25th Summit of Heads of States in Johannesburg,

“This is an opportunistic act only meant to pit African leaders against each other in the name of international law, but also hijack the vision to have Agenda 2063 operationalised,” Masango said in a statement.

African leaders were discussing issues hampering Africa’s development, these including women empowerment, immigration, and xenophobia at the AU Summit.

The summit also sought to align issues with Agenda 2063, Africa’s blueprint for development in the next 50 years.

Masango said the AU has serious business to consider, including economies of Africa, regional trade integration, infrastructure development, xenophobia, illicit financial flows, and uncontrolled migration.

“The task at hand that ought to occupy Africans is to make Africa a better continent, whose place on the global stage is respected. Government should be alert to opportunism by civil society organisations whose claim to legitimacy is to ‘strengthen democracy by overseeing African governments’, while the opposite is true,” he said.

Masango added that African leaders appear to be subjected to the International Crimes Court (ICC), and “if things continue this way, the Committee might have to advise government to re-look its membership of the ICC,” he said.

“In fact, it would be best if the entire continent follows suit. Although SA holds international governance structures in high regard, it is crucial that their programmes are not open to sinister objectives and hidden agendas.”

 

 

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