South Africa 16.4.2015 11:50 am

Hundreds unite for anti-xeno protest

People have started arriving at the Curries Fountain stadium in Durban for the Peace March asking for peace in the Durban area and KwaZulu-Natal province, which is engulfed by xenophobic attacks on foreign nationals. Picture: Phumlani Thabethe. Date: 16 April 2015

People have started arriving at the Curries Fountain stadium in Durban for the Peace March asking for peace in the Durban area and KwaZulu-Natal province, which is engulfed by xenophobic attacks on foreign nationals. Picture: Phumlani Thabethe. Date: 16 April 2015

Hundreds of South Africans have turned up at the anti-xenophobia protests march meant to highlight the plight of foreign nationals who have come under attack from local mobs attempting to drive them out of the country.

At about 10:00, the Curries Fountain Stadium where the march is scheduled to start was already teaming with protesters. “I do not like what is happening here in Durban – it is taking us back to the dark days of violence,” Busi Kunene, a Durban University of Technology (DUT) student, said. Francis Obrien, another South African, said the march would send out a strong message that violence cannot be the answer to the myriad of challenges faced by South Africans.

“We are also hoping that the march would send a message to law enforcement agencies to do more in quelling the violence,” she said.

The protesters, who are scheduled to march through the CBD on their way to the City Hall, will be joined by KwaZulu-Natal Premier, Senzo Mchunu, religious leaders and other representatives from Civil society.

Foreign nationals, some of whom have fled to refugees camps, are currently under attack in various spots around Durban after their businesses were looted.

The violence which was initially restricted to Durban’s surrounding townships such as Umlazi and Kwamashu, this week spread to the Durban CBD.

Five people have already died since the violence broke out three weeks ago

 

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