South Africa 10.11.2014 12:30 pm

Duduzane Zuma crash inquest continues

FILE PICTURE: Duduzane Zuma, president Jacob Zuma's son with his legal team at  Randburg Magistrate's Court, 4 November 2014, for inquest into an accident in February in which one person was killed. Picture: Nigel Sibanda

FILE PICTURE: Duduzane Zuma, president Jacob Zuma's son with his legal team at Randburg Magistrate's Court, 4 November 2014, for inquest into an accident in February in which one person was killed. Picture: Nigel Sibanda

An accident in Sandton in February in which a woman was killed would not have happened if President Jacob Zuma’s son Duduzane had not lost control of his car, an inquest into the matter heard on Monday.

“Would you agree that had you not lost control and not bumped the taxi the accident wouldn’t have happened?” Prosecutor Yusuf Baba asked.

“I agree,” Duduzane Zuma said.

He said he could not hold minibus taxi driver Jabulani Vusi Dlamini responsible for the collision.

When asked how fast he was driving on the night of February 1, Zuma said he could only estimate that he was driving between 90 and 120km between the highway and the Grayston off-ramp where the accident took place.

Baba said bills from the e-toll gantries on the N1 highway near Rivonia would show the court the speed and time that Zuma’s Porsche and Dlamini’s taxi were travelling at on the highway.

Zuma, in a blue suit, a light blue striped shirt, and a navy blue tie, stood in the witness box.

Dlamini was sitting in the third row of the public gallery.

Zuma’s Porsche rear-ended Dlamini’s minibus taxi in the rain on the M1 south off-ramp to Grayston Drive, Sandton. Minibus passenger Phumzile Dube was killed and three others were injured.

According to Zuma’s statement, he lost control of his Porsche after it hit a puddle. It spun and hit the back of the taxi, coming to a standstill facing oncoming traffic.

In July, the National Prosecuting Authority said it declined to prosecute Zuma due to insufficient evidence.

Spokesman Nathi Mncube said at the time the matter would be referred to a magistrate for a formal inquest to determine whether the accident was caused by human error.

Sapa

 

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