South Africa 4.7.2014 11:28 am

Radovan Krejcir moved to high court

FILE PICTURE: Czech fugitive Radovan Krejcir kisses his wife Katerina Krejcirova goodbye following the postponement of proceedings in the Palm Ridge Magistrates court in Johannesburg 09 June 2014. The trial against Krejcir and five others was postponed due to legal representation issues. Picture: Refilwe Modise

FILE PICTURE: Czech fugitive Radovan Krejcir kisses his wife Katerina Krejcirova goodbye following the postponement of proceedings in the Palm Ridge Magistrates court in Johannesburg 09 June 2014. The trial against Krejcir and five others was postponed due to legal representation issues. Picture: Refilwe Modise

The case against Czech fugitive Radovan Krejcir and seven others was transferred to the High Court by the Alexandra Magistrate’s Court on Friday.

“The matter is to be transferred to the High Court division in the Palm Ridge Court, and is set for 13 April 2015,” said Magistrate Renier Boshoff.

Radovan Krejcir, Siboniso Miya, Owen Serero, Zodumo Biyela, ex-crime intelligence Sergeant Nandi Nkosi, Welcome Nkanyiso Mafunda, Siphiwe Memela, and Bulgarian Mike Grigorov face charges of conspiracy to kill police Colonel Nkosana “Killer” Ximba and forensic investigator Paul O’Sullivan.

Charges against another co-accused, Jacob Nare, were withdrawn.

Prosecutor Lawrence Gcaba said the state had completed the indictment and the case docket would be handed to the defence teams by July 16.

Piet du Plessis, for Radovan Krejcir, said he noted the date for trial but disagreed with it.

“We note the 13 April date, but I will approach the [National Prosecuting Authority] and the court roll manager to move the date forward,” Du Plessis said.

Radovan Krejcir, wearing a black jacket and checked shirt, kept smiling at his wife Katerina Krejcirova and their son Dennis seated in the gallery before proceedings began.

Heavily armed police tactical team members surrounded the courtroom, ensuring tight security around the accused.

Only SABC cameras were allowed inside the courtroom.

– Sapa

 

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