South Africa 11.9.2018 12:58 pm

Longstanding Hammanskraal water crisis ‘solved’

Hammanskraal resident, Margaret Murudu allegedly became sick before the metro undertook to clean the local dams.

Hammanskraal resident, Margaret Murudu allegedly became sick before the metro undertook to clean the local dams.

The metro said the water was now safe to drink and its colour had returned to normal.

The longstanding Hammanskraal water crisis has finally been resolved, the Tshwane metro said.

The metro said in a statement that the water was now safe to drink and its colour had returned to normal.

Two months ago, the SA Human Rights Commission (SAHRC), following violent protests by locals and requests for it to intervene, investigated the “dirty water” and found evidence of a “prima facie violation” of the residents’ right to clean drinking water, reported Pretoria North Rekord.

ALSO READ: Hammanskraal water will be clean in 10 days – City of Tshwane

However, the SAHRC said it had found no indication of cholera in the water and residents were not at risk of any health complications.

The metro said water supply had improved and it had therefore withdrawn water tankers from the area, which it had used as an alternative sanitary water source.

The city said in a statement: “The quality of drinking water in Hammanskraal and surrounding areas has improved and no longer has an odour and a brown colour, following reports of suspected cholera contamination in the area around June. The city had resorted to supplying water through tankers even though the reports were dismissed after tests proved that there was no trace of cholera in the water.

“As a result, the metro will as of 7 September withdraw the water tankers that were supplying residents in the area with drinking water. The water provision will go back to the normal pipeline supply.”

Hammanskraal residents’ forum spokesperson Tumelo Koitheng said the forum would continue to monitor all the water treatment plants, reservoirs, and distribution networks for compliance with drinking water standards.

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