South Africa 13.6.2018 01:07 pm

Eskom says power stations operate optimally despite wage protest

Steam rises at sunrise from the  Lethabo Power Station, a coal-fired power station owned by state power utility Eskom near Sasolburg, South Africa, March 2, 2016. Picture: Reuters

Steam rises at sunrise from the Lethabo Power Station, a coal-fired power station owned by state power utility Eskom near Sasolburg, South Africa, March 2, 2016. Picture: Reuters

Workers are protesting the company’s decision to not hike wages this year.

Eskom said on Wednesday its power stations continued to operate optimally in line with contingency measures put in place to mitigate the impact of a wage strike.

Workers are protesting the company’s decision not to hike wages this year. They have demanded a 15% increase across the board.

“Eskom’s power stations and other critical facilities continue to operate optimally in line with the contingency measures that the company has put in place to ensure the security of power supply during this period of wildcat strikes,” the power utility said.

“There are, however, a few isolated incidents where some protesting workers tried to blockade the entrances of our power stations, but these situations have been quelled by the presence of the public order police,” it added, saying the situation was tense, but stable.

Eskom said it could not raise wages because of its difficult financial situation.

But unions representing its workers, namely the National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa and the National Union of Mineworkers, say the company, whose former senior executives were pushed out over corruption charges, is dealing with “a self-imposed crisis”.

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