South Africa 19.5.2014 06:00 am

E-toll ‘human error’ debacle

FILE PICTURE: E-toll objectors gather before taking part in a mass protest drive along the tolled highways. Picture: Michel Bega

FILE PICTURE: E-toll objectors gather before taking part in a mass protest drive along the tolled highways. Picture: Michel Bega

The Electronic Toll Collection (ETC) consortium has admitted to sending final letters of demand for outstanding e-toll payments, but has put them down to simple “human error”.

“This was a simple human error which resulted in the sending of test e-mails to live addresses. ETC is in the process of contacting the parties concerned to apologise,” it told The Citizen.

Justice Project SA (JPSA) revealed earlier this week that the letters were sent via e-mail. It accused the SA National Roads Agency Ltd (Sanral) of lying when it said no final demand invoices were issued.

“Sanral has sent communication as final reminder of outstanding payment, but no final demand invoices,” said Mona.

It had not requested any summons to be issued by the National Prosecuting Authority.

“We are still following the normal process of following up on outstanding toll fees. The issuing of summons is the last resort. We would … rather have road-users register for their e-toll accounts [and] avoid … the legal route.”

Sanral’s “head doesn’t appear to know what the tail is doing”, charged JPSA chairperson Howard Dembovsky.

An e-mail received by a company on May 2, 2014 that contained the final letter showed that summonses had been issued.

Sanral’s Violations Processing Centre is run by the ETC.

 

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