South Africa 19.5.2014 06:00 am

DA seeks legal advice on Nkandla

FILE PICTURE: A view of the controversial homestead of South African President Jacob Zuma in Nkandla on January 21, 2014. Picture: AFP.

FILE PICTURE: A view of the controversial homestead of South African President Jacob Zuma in Nkandla on January 21, 2014. Picture: AFP.

The DA yesterday said consultations were under way that would lead to legal action against plans by the security cluster ministers to legally challenge the public protector’s report on the Nkandla security upgrades.

The security cluster last week made the announcement about their plans to challenge Public Protector Thuli Madonsela’s report in court. They said the report lacked clarity in some areas, and that her findings were “irrational, contradictory and informed by material errors of law”.

DA federal executive chairperson James Selfe described the decision by the security cluster as a transparent case of the executive wanting to interfere with the independence and impartiality of Chapter Nine institutions.

“The Constitution requires organs of State to assist and protect the Public Protector for the independence, impartiality, dignity and effectiveness of the Constitution,” Selfe said.

“We have to wait and see what the security cluster’s course of action will be before deciding on our own. The cluster is the organ of State and this planned court action will have constitutional implications.”

Selfe said the organisation would also take legal action in a push for the re-appointment of the parliamentary ad hoc committee on Nkandla.

The committee was established to probe President Jacob Zuma’s response to the damning report of Madonsela into the R246 million upgrades to his Nkandla home.

The committee was dissolved through a majority vote by the ANC late last month as the ruling party cited a lack of time and referred its work to the fifth Parliament. Selfe said the party would take the ad hoc committee matter further after the election of the new Speaker of Parliament.

 

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