South Africa 14.1.2018 08:29 am

Ramaphosa guns for NPA boss Abrahams – report

National Prosecuting Authority head Shaun Abrahams during a press briefing in Pretoria. Picture: Jacques Nelles

National Prosecuting Authority head Shaun Abrahams during a press briefing in Pretoria. Picture: Jacques Nelles

The prosecutions boss reportedly refused in December to pursue a dozen cases brought to him by prosecutors working on state capture cases.

President Jacob Zuma and National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) head Shaun Abrahams could soon be without jobs, according to a Sunday Times report.

The paper reports that ANC president Cyril Ramaphosa plans to remove Abrahams from his post this week apparently after receiving legal opinion advising him that he could do so immediately. Ramaphosa is said to have sought the legal advice after he learned of Abrahams’s apparent refusal last month to pursue a dozen cases brought to him by prosecutors working on state capture cases.

Meanwhile, Zuma’s fate is expected to be discussed at a meeting of the ANC’s highest decision-making body between conferences, the national executive committee (NEC), which starts on Thursday.

It is also being reported that Ramaphosa was behind Zuma’s decision this week to announce the appointment of a commission of inquiry into state capture. This after he met with Zuma on Sunday and instructed him to announce the commission.

Speaking at the ANC’s 106th anniversary celebrations at the Buffalo City Stadium in East London on Saturday, Ramaphosa welcomed the appointment of the inquiry saying a top priority was to pursue those responsible for state capture.

“We shall confront corruption and state capture in all the forms and manifestations that these scourges assume. This includes the immediate establishment of a commission of inquiry into state capture. The investigation and prosecution of those responsible will be given top priority,” he said.

ALSO READ:

ANC committed to land expropriation, says Ramaphosa

For more news your way, follow The Citizen on Facebook and Twitter.

 

today in print