South Africa 5.1.2018 05:49 pm

Eastern Cape education celebrates improvements

PHOTO: ANA

PHOTO: ANA

The province has achieved a 5.7 percent improvement from 59.3  percent in 2016, to 65 percent in 2017. 

Despite remaining in the bottom of the nine provinces in the outcome of  the 2017 matric results, the Eastern Cape department of education on Friday, celebrated an ‘improvement’ from the results of the previous years.

Announcing the results at Stirling Leadership Institute at East London, the Eastern Cape education MEC Mandla Makupula said, 43,981 learners have passed their senior certificate examination out of 67,648 learners who wrote matric exams.

He said emphasis should not be on quantity but it also be taken into consideration that the Free State which came on top had 28,000 learners who wrote matric compared to the numbers that wrote in Eastern Cape.

“Overall we are the second most improved province,” said Makupula.

“The number of Bachelor passes increased from 19 percent in 2016 to 23 percent in 2017. This phenomenal improvement to previous year as the portion of learners obtaining a Bachelor pass has never surpassed 20 percent since 2014.”

A number of learners who passed with distinction have also increased from 2.1 percent in 2016 to 2.7 in 2017.

“Nelson Mandela Bay district had the highest percentage of distinctions at 4.5 percent, followed by Buffalo City at 3.9 percent and OR Tambo at 3.4 percent.”

Nelson Mandela Bay also topped the province with 72.6 percent pass rate from the number of learners that wrote, followed by Sarah Baartman at 71.8 percent. Amathole has been named as the worst performing education district. Bhongolwethu Senior Secondary School from Amathole District was named the worst performed school. At least 34 schools across the province achieved 100 percent pass rate.

Makupula attributed the success of the class of 2017 to the stability within the department of education.

– African News Agency (ANA)

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