South Africa 12.10.2017 09:38 pm

The man accused of murdering Blydeville teen says he fired several shots to ‘protect himself’

Slain Blydeville teenager Spencer Tshukudu's family at the Lichtenburg Magistrate's Court on October 12. The case was postponed to October 19 for a ruling on the accused's bail application. From left to right: Elsie Marope (aunt) Dorah Tshukudu (mother), Elisa Marope (cousin), and his aunts Rebecca and Susan Tshukudu.

Slain Blydeville teenager Spencer Tshukudu's family at the Lichtenburg Magistrate's Court on October 12. The case was postponed to October 19 for a ruling on the accused's bail application. From left to right: Elsie Marope (aunt) Dorah Tshukudu (mother), Elisa Marope (cousin), and his aunts Rebecca and Susan Tshukudu.

He told the court that he was innocent and not a violent person and added that the case against him was not strong.

A 46-year-old man accused of killing teenager Spencer Tshukudu in Blydeville will hear next week whether he has been granted bail.

Magistrate Motlhopa Diale was expected to make a ruling on the bail application on October 19.

Jaco du Plooy of Rietfontein farm, appeared briefly in the Lichtenburg Magistrate’s Court on Thursday. He is facing a charge of murder and two of attempted murder.

He contended in court that he had fired several shots into a group of people to protect himself and his workers after they came under attack.

“We were in great danger. My employees jumped out [of a van] and ran for their lives, I fired several shots in defense. They had stones and rocks as they were attacking us,” he said in an affidavit read by his lawyer Peet du Plessis.

Du Plooy alleged that Tshukudu was part of a violent crowd who intended killing them.

He allegedly killed the teenager near Sukran in Lichtenburg on October 10 while he was diverting traffic to avoid the protest down the road, which had been barricaded with stones in Blydeville.

He told the court he was innocent and not a violent person and added that the case against him was not strong.

But investigating officer, Captain Ratati Monyai, told the court Du Plooy’s life had not been under threat, as there were no stone at the scene of the incident and his van was not damaged.

He said Tshukudu was about 700m away from the protest when he was shot dead.

“He was only trying to help divert cars, not approach the violent protest,” he said.

He told the court Tshukudu was shot in the forehead between the eyes.

Monyai told the court if Du Plooy was granted, bail violence would escalate, his life would be in danger. He added that the accused’s wife had fled from their rented farm because she feared for her safety.

He told the court his investigation could take up to two months to be finalised and he still had to find four of Du Plooy’s workers who were present when the incident occurred.

He had not been able to trace them, as their cell phones were off and their addresses had not been provided to him.

Prosecutor Rebaone Mokgosi also urged the court not to grant bail, on the basis that it might lead to public violence.

Diale then asked Mogosi to explain the purpose of bail, to which the prosecutor replied that it was to ensure that the accused attended court until the case was finalised.

“Is the community aware of the accused’s right to bail, do they understand the purpose of bail?” the magistrate asked.


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