Business 7.3.2017 07:36 pm

MTN SA CEO Mteto Nyati resigns

Photo: Supplied

Photo: Supplied

Godfrey Motsa, vice president of South and East Africa at MTN Group, was announced as the new CEO.

MTN South Africa’s chief executive, Mteto Nyati, will be stepping down from his position with effect from next week, MTN Group announced on Tuesday.

Nyati, a former managing director of Microsoft South Africa, will be leaving the telecommunications giant after two-and-a-half years to join JSE-listed technology group, Altron, as its chief executive.

MTN said Godfrey Motsa, the vice president of South and East Africa at MTN Group, would assume the position of chief executive of MTN SA with effect from Monday.

Motsa has over 10 years experience in the mobile telecoms industry, having occupied the positions of chief executive of Vodacom Lesotho, chief executive of Vodacom DRC and more recently, chief officer consumer business unit at Vodacom SA.

Karl Toriola, the current vice president of West and Central Africa, will assume the additional responsibility as vice president of South and East Africa region in the interim.

Incoming MTN Group chief executive and president, Rob Shuter said he was delighted that Motsa would assume the position of chief executive at MTN South Africa.

“We have worked well together in the past and I know he brings considerable experience and value to the position,” Shuter said.

MTN Group chairman, Phuthuma Nhleko said the appointment of Motsa would hopefully bring to finality seminal management changes that the Group has had to undertake in the last 12 months.

“I would like to take the opportunity to thank Mteto for his contribution to MTN SA and wish him the best in his future endeavours,” Nhleko said.

Last week, MTN reported a loss of $200 million in 2016 after suffering a huge fine in Nigeria and currency challenges in key markets in what it described as “the most challenging year in the company’s 22-year history”.

– African News Agency

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