South Africa 28.11.2016 08:35 am

Steve Hofmeyr preaches to Afrikaners to unite for self-rule

FILE PICTURE: Sunette Bridges (left) and Steve Hofmeyr (centre) pose for photographs after Bridges symbolically chained herself to the base of the Paul Kruger statue, 8 April 2015, in Pretoria, after the statue was vandalised. White Afrikaners gathered to protest against the vandalism and the possible removal of other statues around the country. Picture: Michel Bega

FILE PICTURE: Sunette Bridges (left) and Steve Hofmeyr (centre) pose for photographs after Bridges symbolically chained herself to the base of the Paul Kruger statue, 8 April 2015, in Pretoria, after the statue was vandalised. White Afrikaners gathered to protest against the vandalism and the possible removal of other statues around the country. Picture: Michel Bega

The singer told hundreds of supporters in Pretoria that the architect of apartheid, Verwoerd, needed to be given more credit.

Afrikaner singer and activist Steve Hofmeyr, along with about 500 other Afrikaners, gathered on Saturday at Church Square in Pretoria to declare that their “volk” (nation) needs to stand up to establish unity among Afrikaners.

He said that the so-called “deadweight” of transformation, reconciliation and white guilt needed to be dropped.

He said the Afrikaner nation needed the opportunity to rule over its own special interests. He even claimed that the purpose of apartheid had never been to oppress anyone.

READ MORE: Hofmeyr now wants a ‘Wexit’

“That is a lie that was used to bully a small minority,” he said in Afrikaans. In a reference to Brexit and the recent election of Donald Trump, he claimed that nations now want “apartheid” again in 2016 so that “different groups can develop and take responsibility for the things within their group … it has nothing to do with hatred”.

Picture: Steve Hofmeyr's Facebook page

Picture: Steve Hofmeyr’s Facebook page

He said Brexit and Trump’s elections had encouraged him to believe that the “universal right” of independence would be restored to his “people”.

READ MORE: Sharpeville was not a human rights transgression – Steve Hofmeyr

In perhaps his most controversial comment to the group – some of whom were carrying the old South African flag, although the old flag of the Boers’ Transvaal Republic (known as the Vierkleur) was far more common – he defended late apartheid Prime Minister HF Verwoerd, who the world would “realise was right … more right than he gets credit for … it is a right to develop separately without interference”, said Hofmeyr.

 

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