Oscar Trial 21.10.2014 09:17 am

Hive of activity outside High Court where Oscar will hear his fate

Oscar Pistorius is guarded by a heavy police presence arrives for his sentencing at court in Pretoria. Picture: Yadhana Jadoo.

Oscar Pistorius is guarded by a heavy police presence arrives for his sentencing at court in Pretoria. Picture: Yadhana Jadoo.

A hive of activity surrounded the North Gauteng High Court on Tuesday, where Paralympian Oscar Pistorius will learn his fate.

Local and international journalists swarmed the area outside court, setting up equipment and jostling for position while waiting for the double amputee blade runner to make his appearance.

A strong police presence was on hand to control the crowds of reporter and public.

Court proceedings are scheduled to start at 9:30am.

It was very similar to the first day of the trial in March this year, except this time, there were no torrential downpours.

Most attention grabbing of all was prison activist Golden-Miles Bhudu who stood outside court shackled in his signature chains. “They say Oscar cries like a baby, screams like a woman and shoots like a soldier,” he screamed to onlookers.

Dressed in a bright orange t-shirt, he held placards in either hands reading: “Why are certain offenders more equal than others before the law?”

Judge Thokozile Masipa will sentence Pistorius for shooting dead his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day last year.

The 27-year-old was found guilty of culpable homicide in a seven month trial that has gripped international audiences.

His fall from grace occurred when the double amputee blade runner shot four times through the bathroom door of his Pretoria home. Three bullets ploughed into model and law graduate Steenkamp, 30.

Steenkamp had been dating Pistorius for three months prior to the incident. They had met through mutual friends.

Throughout the trial, Pistorius has maintained he mistook Steenkamp for an intruder.

Masipa, although finding him to be a “very poor witness”, accepted his version.

Advocate Barry Roux for Pistorius in sentencing procedures last week asked for correctional supervision to be the acceptable sentence. Using Ubuntu in the crux of his argument, Roux indicated that this would be in line with “restorative

justice”. Pistorius was already a “broken man”, he added.

But prosecutor Gerrie Nel did not hold back in a call for justice for the Steenkamp family, which he said had been “broken” by Reeva’s death.

He asked Masipa to consider a 10 year minimum sentence, which would please society.

 

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