Nigerians ignore outlawed group’s work boycott call to honour war victims

Nigerians ignore outlawed group’s work boycott call to honour war victims

The Biafran War was a war fought between the government of Nigeria and the secessionist state of Biafra from 1967 to 1970. Image: The Republic

During the two and a half years of the Nigerian Civil War, there were about 100,000 military casualties, and as many as 2 million Biafran civilians died of starvation.

A call by outlawed Nigerian group, the Indigenous People of Biafra (IPOB), to boycott work in 11 states in southern Nigeria, in honour of more than two million people killed during Nigeria’s civil war, has largely been ignored by residents and businesspeople.

The Nigerian Civil War, also known as the Biafran War and the Nigerian-Biafran War, was a war fought between the government of Nigeria and the secessionist state of Biafra from 1967 to 1970.

During the two and half years of the war, there were about 100,000 overall military casualties, while between 500,000 and 2 million Biafran civilians died of starvation after the military blockaded Biafra.

Most people on Thursday went about their daily business as usual with the exception of Onitsha, the commercial centre of Anambra state, where one of the main markets was shut down, the East African reported.

The boycott call by IPOB came shortly after 140 of its members were arrested last week after being warned against continued political activity by the Nigerian authorities.

The arrests in the university town of Nsukka followed unlawful processions which were marked by chanting and songs against the government.

President Muhammadu Buhari’s executive order outlawing the Biafran activist organisation, on the grounds that it was a terrorist group, was backed by the Federal High Court in Abuja in September 2017.

– African News Agency (ANA)

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