UK drafts UNSC resolution calling for Libyan ceasefire

Fighters loyal to Libya's UN-backed government are defending the capital from a rival strongman's forces. AFP/Mahmud TURKIA

Fighters loyal to Libya's UN-backed government are defending the capital from a rival strongman's forces. AFP/Mahmud TURKIA

If none of the five permanent members vetoes the resolution and if nine out of 15 members approve it, the resolution will pass.

A UN Security Council (UNSC) resolution has been drafted by the UK calling for a ceasefire in the Libyan capital Tripoli. Diplomatic sources said the UK resolution calls on all sides to cooperate with the UN Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL) and its head Ghassan Salame to reach a ceasefire across Libya, the Libya Observer reported.

If none of the five permanent members of the UNSC vetoes the resolution and if nine out of 15 members approve it, the resolution will pass.

Clashes in southern Tripoli areas between renegade general Khalifa Haftar’s self-styled Libyan National Army (LNA), which is loyal to the opposing House of Representative (HoR) government in Tobruk in the east, continue as they fight forces loyal to the UN-backed Government of National Accord (GNA) based in the capital Tripoli in the West.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO) the death toll is approaching 180 with over 750 injured – a large portion of the casualties are civilians as both sides continue to shell and bomb residential areas indiscriminately.

But talks of a ceasefire and possible peace talks to end the bloodshed seem not only premature but highly improbable at this point in time.

GNA head Fayes Al Sarraj said Hafter is not a true peace partner and will not engage in peace talks with him. Sarraj’s comments were made on Tuesday during a meeting with members of his presidential council. The talks coincided with UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres first visit to the North African country.

Sarraj further asserted that Hafter and his forces would not have swept across from the east into Tripoli to “rid the area of terrorists” if the LNA had not been getting support from outside countries.

These include Saudi Arabia, Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and France.

– African News Agency

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