Africa 3.8.2013 05:00 am

Several held on election related offences

Zimbabwean cops mill around a Mount Pleasant, Harare polling station where they were told to search for their names in another ward. This comes as many in the security forces failed to vote in a two-day special voting exercise about two weeks ago. Photo: Anne Mpalume

Zimbabwean cops mill around a Mount Pleasant, Harare polling station where they were told to search for their names in another ward. This comes as many in the security forces failed to vote in a two-day special voting exercise about two weeks ago. Photo: Anne Mpalume

Several people, including a teacher who sent a message saying President Robert Mugabe should die, have appeared in courts in Zimbabwe accused of committing various election related offences.

On July 26, a Gutu teacher reportedly sent a message to police Commissioner General Augustine Chihuri saying “Chihuri anMugabe you are idiots and a disgrace to Zimbabwe. You will die mose naMugabe. I don’t fear you, come to Batanai Primary School Basera Gutu. Mr C Dondo mhondi”.

Chihuri informed the police who quickly located and arrested the teacher, who had apparently already ‘deleted his message’. The case, that appeared before magistrate Anita Tshuma, was remanded to August 5.

In other cases, John Zengeni (22) was charged with impersonation after he tried to use his brother’s national identity to vote, while Malvern Maketshemu (33), Morris Nhamo Mhlanga (23) have been accused of inciting people to vote for MDC.

Beauty Maenzanise, 36, Nobosi Chamukwira,42, and Kudakwashe Mufari,43, were caught dropping MDC Cross Over rally flyers at a polling station by a ZANU PF electoral agent, while Annah Bvute and Phillip Mabika were arrested for allegedly concealing the voters roll for Budiriro Ward 43 by destroying it.

Zengeni was remanded in custody to Monday for sentencing. Mhlanga, Maketshemu, Bvute, Mabika, Maenzanise, Chamhukirwa and Mufari were also remanded in custody to the same date for bail ruling by their respective magistrates.

 

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