News 26.9.2016 08:33 am

Gauteng school infrastructure money wasted

Picture: Thinkstock

Picture: Thinkstock

Up to four times the cut-off amount is spent on building new schools, says the DA’s shadow MEC for education in Gauteng.

Government is misusing money instead of improving school infrastructure, as many schools in Gauteng are dilapidated and deteriorating.

This was the response by DA Gauteng shadow MEC for education Khume Ramulifho to the social protection, community and human development cluster’s National Development Plan’s (NDP) quarterly feedback at a media briefing in Hatfield yesterday.

Ramulifho says although the cluster had attempted to improve infrastructure across the country and province, too much money was unnecessarily spent on school infrastructure projects.

“A school was opened on Friday in Mamelodi (Nellmapius Secondary School) that cost about R104 million. That money could have been used to build three schools. The president suggested R30 million be the cut-off amount for building schools but in Gauteng; four times that amount is used for facilities,” he said.

Deputy chairperson for the social protection, community and human development cluster Angie Motshekga said the Accelerated Schools Infrastructure Delivery Initiative alleviated basic service challenges in schools in the last quarter.

“To this end, an additional 615 schools have been provided with water, 418 with decent sanitation and 307 with electricity,” Motshekga told the media. Ramulifho says some schools still have dilapidated buildings and infrastructure as government failed to prioritise. He said Dan Kutumela Secondary School in Bronkhorstpruit still had potholes.

“Another school in Bronkhorstspruit, Hoërskool Erasmus, has a dilapidated school hall. You can clearly see that the ceiling gets wet when it rains. It is only a matter of time before the roof completely collapses.”

The Asidi initiative will unveil state-of-the-art schools weekly, built or refurbished at a cost of between R35 million and R50 million each in the last quarter.

 

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