News 22.5.2016 03:05 pm

Zuma welcomed by 8000 at prayer event

President Jacob Zuma. Picture: Siyabulela Duda

President Jacob Zuma. Picture: Siyabulela Duda

Several church groups dressed in colourful attire were present.

President Jacob Zuma received a rousing welcome at the National Prayer Day event held in Durban on Sunday.

A crowd of about 8000, many of whom wore African National Congress T-shirts with Zuma’s portrait emblazoned across the front, cheered wildly as Zuma entered Kings Park Stadium shortly after 1pm at the event hosted by the national arts and culture department. The stadium, home to the Sharks rugby team, has a capacity of about 52,000.

Several church groups dressed in colourful attire were present, while on the field a number of people in camouflage fatigues and a horde of journalists and photographers from various media houses were to be seen.

The event, which had originally been scheduled for April 29, saw various entertainers, ranging from a Burundian drumming group to local church choirs and singers, keeping the crowd entertained until Zuma’s arrival.

According to the programme – which had been scheduled to kick off at 11am – KwaZulu-Natal premier Senzo Mchunu had been due to speak, but community safety, liaison, and transport MEC Willies Mchunu spoke at the event in his place.

Mchunu said he had been asked by the premier to speak on his behalf and that the speech he would be reading was that of the premier.

Other high profile politicians seen at the event included Social Development Minister Bathabile Dlamini, Deputy Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries Minister Bheki Cele, and Small Business Development Minister Lindiwe Zulu.

An enormous contingent of bodyguards escorted Zuma to the stage when he arrived.

Traffic in and around the stadium was severely disrupted in the morning as one of Durban’s major events – the East Coast Radio Big Walk – was taking place at the same time, which saw thousands of people walking past the stadium where the National Prayer Day event was to be held.

 

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