South Africa 21.4.2017 05:46 am

Cyril must do more if he wants to win ANC election, say analysts

Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa addresses delegates during the 2016 SALGA conference held in Johannesburg, 29 November 2016. Picture: Refilwe Modise

Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa addresses delegates during the 2016 SALGA conference held in Johannesburg, 29 November 2016. Picture: Refilwe Modise

Analysts criticised Ramaphosa for his silence, questioning whether he really wanted to win the ANC election.

Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa is trying to position himself for a bruising battle against his opponents in the run-up to the ANC national elective conference in December, a political commentator has said.

Political analyst professor Andre Duvenhage said Ramaphosa has subtlely started to wage a fight against his opponents, but he has to do more than that.

Duvenhage said people had started to question whether Ramaphosa had a backbone as a politician when he, ANC secretary-general Gwede Mantashe and treasurer-general Zweli Mkhize backtracked on their stance regarding President Jacob Zuma’s recent Cabinet reshuffle.

“He should know that Zuma is portraying himself as a man of the people while he is trying to present Ramaphosa as a symbol of monopoly capital,” Duvenhage said.

Duvenhage’s view was echoed by another analyst, professor Mcebisi Ndletyana.

Ndletyana criticised Ramaphosa for his silence, questioning whether he really wanted to win the ANC election.

Addressing a dinner organised by the Black Business Council in Sandton on Wednesday night, Ramaphosa said there must be no compromise in the fight against corruption, patronage and rent-seeking.

“We will not allow the institutions of our state to be captured by families and individuals intent on narrow self-enrichment,” said Ramaphosa.

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