Africa 2.7.2017 10:50 pm

Nigeria has potential to feed Africa, says SA-based group

FILE PICTURE: A maize plant is seen among other dried maize at a field in Hoopstad, a maize-producing district in the Free State province, South Africa, January 13, 2016. South Africa suffered its driest year on record in 2015, the national weather service said on Thursday, as a drought that has threatened the vital maize crop and hit economic growth showed no sign of abating. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko

FILE PICTURE: A maize plant is seen among other dried maize at a field in Hoopstad, a maize-producing district in the Free State province, South Africa, January 13, 2016. South Africa suffered its driest year on record in 2015, the national weather service said on Thursday, as a drought that has threatened the vital maize crop and hit economic growth showed no sign of abating. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko

Nigeria is blessed with good land and weather for all year farming.

Nigeria has the potential to feed herself and Africa, if the agricultural sector is harnessed, says the president of Arewa South Africa, Nimram Longbap-Longs.

Longs said on Sunday that Nigeria is blessed with good land and weather for all year farming.

According to Longs, Nigeria can learn lessons from countries like South Africa, China, the United States of America and Britain on how they made it in agriculture.

“In South Africa for example, five percent of farmers feed the entire country and we can do it in Nigeria.

“Government should show more commitment to agriculture. Our people should stop showing lackadaisical attitudes to agriculture.

“If we did well in that sector in the 1960s, we can still do it again,” he said.

Longs said there was nothing wrong in sharing in the experiences of other countries that are doing well in agriculture to improve the sector in Nigeria.

“Where we are lacking, we should approach other countries to learn from them. Nigeria has great potentialities in agriculture and experts have continued to harp on this,” he said.

Longs stated that if agriculture becomes the mainstay of Nigeria’s economy, the country will have enough funds to improve other sectors of its economy.

Multitudes jailed in Nigerian anti-corruption drive

Nigerian anti-corruption agencies have recorded more than 100 convictions on economic and financial crimes since the beginning of the year.

Chairman of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) Ibrahim Magu disclosed the number in the commercial capital Lagos.

He said 113 suspects had been sentenced.  “We will not fail to bring to book those who have corruptly stolen our common wealth and thereafter organise to destabilise the anti-corruption initiatives,” Magu said.

He vowed to sustain the anti-corruption crusade despite calls on him to step down, ironically because his detractors have accused him of being corrupt.

“I will not relent. I will fight for the interest of our citizens and our children’s future.”

Magu blamed corruption as the catalyst of the inter-tribal and ethnic tensions in the country.

Nigeria is enduring conflict between Fulani herdsmen and villagers, Christian radicals and Muslims as well as renewed hostility between the Hausa and Igbo tribes.

“Corruption is at the root of recent separatist agitations in parts of the country. We need to join forces to defeat these tendencies,” Magu said.

The EFCC was established in 2003 after the Financial Action Task Force on Money Laundering fingered Nigeria as one of the countries non-cooperative in efforts to fight the scourge.

The commission has however been blamed for settling political scores on behalf of the government of President Muhammadu Buhari.

– (ANA-NAN)

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