Editorials 20.9.2016 06:05 am

Find answers for ambulance crisis

People claim that some patients dies while waiting for ambulances| Supplied

People claim that some patients dies while waiting for ambulances| Supplied

These revelations follow the scandalous deaths of 36 mental healthcare patients, who died at various Gauteng centres.

Claims that relatives of kwaito legend Mduduzi Tshabalala, AKA Mandoza, waited for hours for an ambulance to arrive warrant a thorough investigation. The Nkalakatha hit maker died on Sunday after a long battle with cancer.

TMG Entertainment quoted Mandoza’s manager, Kevin Ntaopane, as saying he had to drive the dying artist in his car after his family waited hours for an ambulance to arrive. “I didn’t want to mention it but it calculated to more than three hours, because when she (Mpho, Mandoza’s wife) called me, she said that ‘I’ve been waiting since this morning’,” he said.

These revelations come days after the scandalous deaths of 36 mental healthcare patients, who died at various Gauteng centres. Last year, reports surfaced that Gauteng was about 760 ambulances short of reaching the national target of one ambulance per 10 000 people. The provincial health department also attributed poor response times to a driver shortage.

It is clear these problems are still there, judging by daily reports of desperate people – some who die while waiting for ambulances. In some cases, ambulances simply never arrive. This unacceptable human rights violation must be brought to an end.

 

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