National 16.9.2016 01:26 pm

Zuma paid back the money, now let’s move on – Edward

FILE PICTURE: President Zuma's eldest son Edward arriving at his wedding. (Photo by Gallo Images / Sunday Times / Jackie Clausen)

FILE PICTURE: President Zuma's eldest son Edward arriving at his wedding. (Photo by Gallo Images / Sunday Times / Jackie Clausen)

Edward Zuma has protested against the media and opposition parties for refusing to back down on Nkandla despite his father coughing up R7.8 million this week.

President Jacob Zuma’s son eldest son Edward has come out swinging in his father’s defence following Monday’s announcement by the Presidency that Zuma had settled his R7.8 million Nkandla bill through a home loan he acquired from VBS Mutual Bank.

READ MORE: Zuma pays back the money, but EFF still suspicious

Edward has criticised his father’s detractors, who have asked for proof of payment and the media for failing to bury the matter now that Zuma has finally paid back the money for the undue nonsecurity upgrades to his KwaZulu-Natal homestead.

“When President Zuma paid the R7.8m amount relating to the nonsecurity upgrades‚ true to form‚ the Nkandla matter received a new currency‚ instead of being received and perceived as a fossil that it is objectively‚” Edward said.

He added: “Others escalated their desperation to demanding proof of payment to be made available publicly. This is the kind of poor mental application and selective moral righteousness visited upon our country.”

He said the payment, which was calculated as a reasonable portion of the roughly R216 million spent by National Treasury, should have “heralded the full and final end to the matter as a lucrative media source”.

READ MORE: Here are five facts on the bank that paid Zuma’s Nkandla debt

He has also accused the media of propaganda.

“What defies logic is the fact that citizens have allowed themselves to collapse under the weight of media collusion, making them pliable fodders for what in any credible thought is brave-faced propaganda.”

 

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