National 15.8.2016 02:29 pm

Mngxitama tells of Kgosi Mampuru ‘k****r hair’ torture

RESOLUTE. Black First Land First leader Andile Mngxitama speaks to The
Citizen in Boksburg, Johannesburg, yesterday. Picture: Neil McCartney

RESOLUTE. Black First Land First leader Andile Mngxitama speaks to The Citizen in Boksburg, Johannesburg, yesterday. Picture: Neil McCartney

The BLF leader says he and his comrades have shaved their heads in solidarity.

Black First Land First (BLF) leader Andile Mngxitama took to Facebook to tell of how a “sadistic” prison warder at Kgosi Mampuru II cut the “k****r” hair of his comrades.

The self-proclaimed Bikoist said he and other BLF comrades cut their hair in support of the BLF member who had had his hair cut, allegedly because it was African. Relating his experience as a prisoner for 11 days, Mngxitama says a prison warder cut the hair of the BLF member. It is not clear why the guard had to cut the prisoner’s hair, but Mngxitama said it had something to do with it being “k****r hair”.

This came after the party staged a protest at the Public Protector’s office for R26 billion allegedly stolen by Johann Rupert and other “white minority capitalist”. Armed police were called when the party members refused to leave without being given an audience with Thuli Madonsela, who was at the time in Johannesburg doing charity work in honour of Nelson Mandela.

“After 7 nights at Kgosi Mampuru II prison and one night at Brooklyn police station, the ‪#‎BLF26‬ appeared in court most without their k****r [our  edit] hair. Sadistic prison warder in one section cut the hair of our comrades. We all cut our hair in solidarity. We learn to be one in real struggle. We remain determined to pursue the matter of R26 billion which was stolen by Johann Rupert and co. Whilst others fight other blacks we taking the battle to the settler colonial capitalists,” said Mngxitama.

“We can say with confidence that, “we left new comrades in prison” because the work of Biko doesnt stop, wherever we are, we do black consciousness prison like the university is another important site of struggle!”

The history of cutting black people’s hair in prison dates back to the apartheid years. Popular during those darker times was the “pencil test”, a method of determining whether a person was “coloured” or black African. A pencil would be pushed through the person’s hair, and how easily it came out determined whether the person had “passed” or “failed” the test.

Kgosi Mampuru II could not be immediately reached for comment.

 

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